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Please read my latest article about the High Line on The Three Tomatoes.

 
 
A Web site is never done. They are the object of endless tinkering and updating. A good Web site should be dynamic with new things to look at on successive visits. Not a complete overhaul, of course, but new projects, a new blog entry, additions to the about section, and, best of all, new photos.
Of course my own Web site falls short on many of these ideals. I try, but every writer needs an editor and every Web site needs a content manager.
Remember when we used to have favorite sites? There may be some sites I visit simply because I love the content. The Huffington Post and The NY Times come to mind (and The Onion!). But I don't think of Web sites as items that exist independently any longer. I think of them as connected containers of information that I draw on for work, pleasure, and information. I skate freely from one to another, usually via Google.
 
 
Last night, May 22, I was honored to speak at Superstructures Engineers & Architects on Energy Efficient Restoration of Buildings. This is an important topic because we have a tremendous stock of old buildings, particularly in the Northeast/Midwest. Looking down the road, 80% of the buildings around today will still be around in 2035.
We think the first step in making a building efficient is to add insulation. Think again. The best advice is to start where you get the most bang for your dollar:
•The mechanical system (properly sized)
•Insulate and air seal the roof
•Replace the windows
Then:
•Insulate the walls
Interestingly, the last priority is to look at alternate energy sources on the building--BIPV, wind, etc.
Want to read about an interesting project? Take a look at the Anita Gorman Nature Center in Missouri--it is a net zero building designed by BNIM.